Clinician Interview – Meet Tim Wilkins!

Clinician Interview – Meet Tim Wilkins!

Tim-Wilkins-LPC-Identity-Ann-Arbor-Headshot-1
Tim Wilkins, LPC

Interview with Tim Wilkins, LPC

Check out our interview with Ann Arbor counselor and owner of Identity Counseling Psychology, Tim Wilkins. Tim is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) practicing psychotherapy in Ann Arbor, MI.  Click here to schedule an intake with Tim.

What do you specialize in?

Mainly, I specialize in anxiety disorders and issues related to identity.  My passion is to help others learn to listen to their mind and body in a real way. Through cultivating this type of mindful awareness, I believe that we can access what needs to be accessed for real change to occur. People that I commonly see struggle with things like anxiety, panic attacks, life transitions, sexual or gender identity concerns, life crises, and spiritual issues.

What made you want to become a therapist?

Growing up, I always thought that financial security would greatly contribute to my happiness (I know…). However, like many things in life, once I achieved this, it only made me realize that this was mostly an illusion. Many fantasies are this way. We think fulfilling the fantasy will make us satisfied, so we pursue them relentlessly only to be left with disappointment or worse. This experience, along with a powerful experience as a summer camp counselor, ignited in me the desire to help people in a real and direct way. My own internal work around how I wanted to do this ultimately led me to the field of counseling.

What can clients expect when they first come to therapy? What is a typical therapy session like with you?

First and foremost, they can expect a space of non-judgement. The counseling room is different than the rest of life. It is a time and a space set apart from normal life in which clients can engage with themselves in an honest and genuine way. A typical session lasts just under an hour. Therapy is highly individualized based on clients’ needs, however, it generally will consist of a check in, a main topic for the session, a possible intervention (such as a mindful breathing exercise or a guided meditation), and a discussion about the plan going forward. I use evidence-based practices from psychodynamic and existential theoretical frameworks. It is important that therapy be grounded in theory yet have the flexibility to adapt to client needs each session. Clients will hopefully find my style to be warm, inviting, and empathic.


How have you seen therapy be helpful to your clients?

Therapy is often a drastic interruption to one’s habitual patterns. Cultivating a new level of self-awareness can often lead to a trying time. For this reason, many may have the experience of things getting harder at first. This is likely because real work is being done and clients are facing their struggles head on, maybe for the first time. The good news is that there is often light and air on the other side of the mountain. Therapy is about vulnerability on many levels, so engaging with it authentically will often lead to a new way of being in the world. It will hopefully awaken clients to their deeply rooted defense mechanisms, sub-personalities, fears and passions, and ultimately to their inner self. I believe this type of work is helpful and will hopefully lead to the type of change my clients are interested in, but it takes courage and is not easy.

What do you think are the most important considerations when looking for a therapist?

All the research suggests that regardless of the theoretical orientation or therapeutic style, the most important ingredient in the therapeutic process is the real relationship that occurs between the therapist and the client. Though there are professional boundaries, it is a relationship similar to other relationships. Clients may find that the issues they face in their relationships outside of therapy could often pop up in therapy between the client and the therapist through a process called transference. If this happens, it is a sign that we are truly getting somewhere helpful.

What do you hope your clients walk away with?

I hope my clients walk away with a deeper sense of self and self-awareness that they can integrate into their relationships and work in the world. If there is an acute presenting problem such as recurring panic attacks, I want my clients to walk away with tools to cope with their symptoms. However, more importantly, I want my clients to walk away with the ability and willingness to listen to their symptoms and to allow the symptoms to mobilize them toward genuine transformation.

Visit Tim’s profile to learn more about his counseling services or schedule an appointment.

3 Steps to Finding Greater Meaning in Life

3 Steps to Finding Greater Meaning in Life

What is meaning?

What am I truly passionate about?

What continues to get me up every morning, when I could just continue sleeping?

According to Irvin D. Yalom, “The sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being.” The struggle to discover meaning in the context of life is a human struggle.

I often have people come to therapy and say some version of the following; “When I was younger, I was told that things like art were important. I was told to express myself; that it was important and valued. I had things I was working toward. But as I age, I feel like the rug is slowly being pulled out from under me.”

Step 1: Orientation – Examine where you came from

When we grow up, we are told a lot of different things. We are given a set of boundaries. Begin by exploring the following questions:

  • What were you told to believe?
  • What were you told mattered the most?
  • What were you told was completely off limits?

We have an original Orientation. We are told to never, ever, touch the stove. The stove is hot and dangerous. If we touch the stove, our hand will get burnt. We are taught which things should be meaningful, which topics are important to care about, and especially which things we must avoid at all costs. Never touch the stove.

Step 2: Disorientation – Challenge what you have been told

As we continue to grow, the things that we have been told may slowly start to break down. Our perceptions of these boundaries start to change as we engage with a harsh world. We begin to realize that the stove is not always hot. Sometimes the stove is cool, even cool enough to touch. When we come to this realization, we often begin to engage in a season of Disorientation.

The season of disorientation forces us to ask several hard questions:

  • Who am I, really?
  • What are my true values?
  • Has what happened to me shaped my identity?
  • What are my genuine passions?
  • Do my experiences make me who I am?

In the season of Disorientation, we learn more about ourselves. We think about the things that we have been told to think, do, and believe, and identify ways in which our original orientation may not sit well with us anymore. The stove isn’t always hot, and sometimes it needs to be cleaned.

Step 3: Reorientation – Identify what truly matters to you & give it to others

Many people feel that the experiences themselves are what shape us. However, as we transcend the difficult season of Disorientation, we engage in a third stage, a season of Reorientation. In this season, we learn that our responses to our experiences shape the person that we become.

  • How can I help others with what I believe?
  • What do I want my work in the world to be?
  • Why do I continue to wake up in the morning?

As the universe expands, so does the human psyche. The process of evolving into newer and more expansive beliefs, missions, and states of consciousness can be uncomfortable, especially when those closest to you aren’t going through the same transformation.

In therapy, I work with people through the rhythmic life cycle of Orientation, Disorientation and Reorientation. When we realize that the stove is not always hot, we are bound to get hurt at some point. I work with people to help them discover their inner self. Our inner self is our true self, our source of strength, and unfortunately the part of our self that we are often least in tune with.

As a counselor, my role is to set the table for you to journey through the difficult struggle of inner-self-discovery. It is through difficult introspective inner-self-discovery that we come to understand what it means to be human, and what it means to be me.

If you are interested in engaging the therapeutic process of finding more meaning in life or if you have any questions, contact Tim.


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